Shameless Self-Promotion, part 2: Cyber War Edition

Like my co-blogger Matt Fay, I too have been absent from this blog for far too long. Work and grad school applications (I’ll be attending the LBJ School at UT Austin starting this fall) became a veritable time vortex, but I am hoping to (albeit slowly) get back to blogging now. I will probably post more quick hits rather than lengthy analyses, since I am in fact going to grad school, but hopefully the blog will pick up pace over the summer. Since this is a comeback post of sorts it is only appropriate that it involves my work . . .
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Defining War and Warfare in Cyberspace

Every so often a new technology emerges that puts into question existing definitions of behavior. In international relations, this often happens as a result of new weapons being introduced that substantively affect the conduct of war. The advent of strategic air power gave great powers a new tool for coercion, namely the capability to inflict massive amounts of damage on the civilian population in the hopes of forcing political change—mainly surrender. Though strategic air power did not invent the notion of targeting civilians, a combination of accident and obsession with its hypothetical utility led strategic air power to substantively . . .
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The Implications of Attribution in Cybersecurity

It has been well-known for a while that China is prodding and poking at U.S. computer networks looking for sensitive information. Some of the most serious security breaches in U.S. government agencies and private companies over the past few years originated in China, but because of the unique characteristics of cyberspace it has been difficult to attribute these incursions to specific groups or individuals. In other words, we have not known if the incursions came from some Chinese teenage hacker or a government official working on orders from the higher-ups. That seems to have changed, according to U.S. State . . .
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